Our Town: Pell City – A story of being moved by the power of education

Vickie Harmon, original author of Our Town: Pell City, talks about the history of the city with PCHS drama students who are updating the script.

Vickie Harmon, original author of Our Town: Pell City, talks about the history of the city with PCHS drama students who are updating the script.


By Jeff Thompson, CEPA Executive Director

Jeff Thompson

Jeff Thompson

I’m being impressed like I haven’t been in quite a while.

Earlier this year, The Heart of Pell City Downtown Revitalization approached me with a proposition. “We found a play about Pell City,” Urainah Glidewell said. “Do you think we could put it on at CEPA?”

The script was written by Vickie Harmon, then a teacher with the Pell City School System, in 1990 for the city’s Centennial Anniversary. She called it “Our Town,” and it featured narrator Rob Skelton walking the audience through the founding of Pell City and some of it’s most notable characters. It’s fantastic, and I was on board.

Well, a week or two later, Urainah, Vickie and I approached PCHS Drama Teacher Ginger McCurry with a proposal of our own: Would her classes like to put the production on? Ginger loved the idea. So, we decided to update the script a bit and have a final version in front of the students on the first day of school.

Of course,  that didn’t happen. Mostly because updating the script fell to me, and I didn’t do it. I’m rather embarrassed about that now, but at the same time I’m really not. What we’re doing is so much cooler.

Imagine yourself in high school, third day of your senior year, and some strange man you’ve never met before wanders into your class and tells you that over the next week, you’re going to write a play. He freely admits that he has no experience in this department, and he’s fairly sure you don’t either. Of course, that doesn’t matter, he says. We’re doing it anyway.

That really happened. I was staring into a room full of dinner-plate eyes, the ones looking at me anyway. The rest just went back to their own conversations. It took a minute, but with Ms. McCurry’s lead we broke two classes into seven groups and proceeded to write the first play that would be credited in part to the Pell City High School Drama Department.

Now, let me tell you how I thought this would go. I assumed the classes would read Mrs. Harmon’s script and collect a few characters, we’d write a handful of dialogue and we’d launch this thing by the end of the week.

But that wasn’t it at all.

The second day I walked in to class, I get bombarded. I had previously dropped stacks of research into these students’ laps and walked away with ambivalence. When I came back, there was nothing but energy. These students not only dug through the history of Pell City to find the city’s roots, they started digging to find their own.

They went home and asked their parents about the creation of Lake Logan Martin. Students asked about the Mill and who in their families worked there. They researched their own genealogy. One student went to the St. Clair County Archives in Ashville on her own to to dig deeper.

Then, they all told each other their stories.

I learned in that moment the infectious nature of education. Excitement breeds creativity and critical thinking, and being connected to it when it manifests in a student is a feeling that I’ve never felt in another setting.

Seeing a student care about something in the way these have will make you wish immediately that you had the time to provide more opportunities like this. It has with me, anyway.

In about six weeks, they’re going to take the script they wrote and perform it for you as part of Avondale Mils Day on October 1. I have to say, what they came up with better than I ever imagined. I know that October 1 is a football day, but this year I can honestly say I’m going to sell my tickets to make sure I’m here for this one.

So, It’s going to be worth it, I promise. And to prove it, I’m posting a piece of the script below.

Tell me you don’t want to see this on stage.


1901, Pell City. A train set enters from stage right with eight people on board, one male one female sit stage front of the others. As it pulls in, the man rises to his feet and looks frantically out the windows.

Lydia DeGaris: What is it I’m looking at here, Sumter, dear? This is a far, far cry from what you said.

Sumter Cogswell: Honestly, Lydia, I just don’t know. I simply don’t. (Begins to move more frantically)

Lydia DeGaris: That factory looks dreadful, surely no one’s in there?

Sumter Cogswell: (Voice gradually getting louder) Of course not. Look at it. There are cows on the property!

Lydia DeGaris: (Calmly) Oh, and look at that, dear. How embarrassing. Are those goats?

Sumter Cogswell: You know those are goats! There are goats on the floor of the Maxwell Building. Goats!

Lydia DeGaris: (Snickers) I think there’s more wood over the windows of this town than being used as walls. I’m sorry, dear, I’m not being ugly, but this is not what you described.

Depot man enters the train.

Depot man: Pell City, folks. Pell City. Don’t reckon any of y’all are gettin’ off here, so we’ll just keep on moving.

Sumter Cogswell: Wait! We’re getting off. Other passengers look at Cogswell in disbelief. Let’s go, Lydia.

Lydia DeGaris: (Sarcastically) Sumter, dear, I think I’m overdressed.


See you October 1 at 7 p.m. for the performance of Our Town: Pell City.

Work at CEPA – Contract Positions Available Now

cropped-IMG_7146.jpg

CEPA – The Pell City Center for Education and Performing Arts is interested in supporting the local economy by contracting with independent service providers in our area.

As the facility increases its programming options for the community, CEPA Management Company is in need of qualified technical and custodial contractors. These services are invaluable to creating a memorable and inspiring event for area residents who visit the Pell City Center.

CEPA is seeking proposals from independent custodial contractors to clean the facility following events. Duties would include collection and removal of garbage, cleaning bathrooms and sweeping and vacuuming, as well as other custodial tasks assigned by CEPA Management.

The work would be expected to take place beginning approximately 30 minutes after the conclusion of a performance and would conclude no more than two hours following the start of the work. 


Click Here to Download the Request for Proposal – Custodial Services

Click Here to Download the Sample Contract – Custodial Services


CEPA is also seeking proposals from independent technical contractors to provide sound, lighting, multimedia, screen and curtain services during events. Duties would include pre-event checks to insure equipment is working properly, setup and teardown of CEPA-owned equipment, working with lessees to provide requested technical services and delivering flawlessly, and operation of CEPA-owned equipment during rehearsals and events.

The work would be expected to take place beginning approximately one hour prior to a performance or rehearsal and would conclude no more than one hour following the performance’s conclusion.


Click Here to Download the Request for Proposal – Technical Services

Click Here to Download the Sample Contract – Technical Services


Proposals are due by September 1, 2016 and should be sent to CEPA Executive Director Jeff Thompson via email at pellcitycepa@gmail.com or mailed or delivered to the Center, 25 Williamson Drive, Pell City 35125. For additional information, email pellcitycepa@gmail.com or call the Center at (205) 338-1974.


CEPA Cleaning Contract v2

CEPA Tech Contract v2

RFP – 082016 – Technician Services v2

RFP – 082016 – Custodial Services v2

Pell City candidates to debate on August 12

57991f25c447e.image

On August 12, The Heart of Pell City Downtown Revitalization, the Rotary Club of Pell City and the St. Clair News-Aegis will host the 2016 Pell City Candidate Debate, open to those qualified to participate in the upcoming Municipal Election on August 23.

View or Download Event Program

These organizations have partnered in order to provide a forum for candidates to present their visions for the city and discuss key local issues in front of engaged citizens. The 2016 Pell City Candidate Debate will be held at CEPA – The Pell City Center for Education and Performing Arts and is free and open to the public.

Debates provide candidates with a rare opportunity to present their messages organically and to a diverse audience. And for those who attend, these events provide critical education about their choices prior to election day.

The event will feature an evening of conversation as candidates discuss questions submitted by the public and selected by a non-affiliated committee. Topics will include local economic growth, Pell City Schools, infrastructure, industrial development and others.

During the evening, candidates running for both Pell City Mayor and City Council positions will be given an opportunity to speak directly to voters. Only candidates representing contested positions were invited to participate.

Full event details will be released the week of August 1. For more or to submit topics you would like to see candidates discuss during the debate, contact Kristen Dale at the News-Aegis at (205) 884-2310 or email kdale@newsaegis.com.

CEPA is located next to Pell City High School at 25 Williamson Drive, Pell City, AL 35125.


Invited to participate:

Pell City Mayor

Joe Funderburg (Incumbent)

Bill Pruitt

City Council District 1

Jay Jenkins (Incumbent)

David Arnett

City Council District 3

Dot Wood (Incumbent)

Blaine Henderson

City Council District 4

Sharon Thomas (Incumbent)

Jason Mitcham

City Council District 5

Terry Templin (Incumbent)

Jud Alverson

Phil Roberson

Free Movie: See ‘Honoring the Code’ on July 26 at CEPA

emotionheader_1

Free showing of “Honoring the Code: Warriors and Moral Injury”

July 26 • 6 p.m. • CEPA


In an effort to shed more light on moral injury, a condition many veterans battle, a free showing of Honoring the Code: Warriors and Moral Injury will be held on Tuesday, July 26 at 6 p.m. at the Pell City Center for Performing Arts.

This film, provided by Crosswinds Foundation for Faith and Culture, explores the impact of moral injury, a relative unknown despite the fact some believe it is one contributor to the increasing suicide rate among the veteran population as compared to the civilian population. This trauma has been largely overshadowed by and oftentimes confused with post-traumatic stress. For it is only as this trauma is rightly understood that the correct help can be sought and provided.

Honoring the Code examines the brief history of moral injury, including why it is such a relatively new diagnosis. This film also explores the impact of moral injury on combat veterans who have served in wars from WWII through the current wars in the Middle East. Veterans from these wars share their personal stories of how war has brought them to feel personal shame and guilt.

In addition to the veterans, through interviews with researchers, clinicians, medical doctors, political leaders, and military experts Honoring the Code: Warriors and Moral Injury opens the door to look not only at the cause of moral injury but the avenues of help available for the veteran and his or her family members. The film helps to set the record straight and provide much-needed clarification. For it is only as this trauma is rightly understood that the correct help can be sought and provided.

Crosswinds Foundation’s Linwood Bragan will introduce the movie during the event at CEPA. Everyone is welcome and there is no charge to attend! To reserve your seat, please contact Wayne Johnson, Veterans Outreach Agent Assistant, at (205) 338-9416.

A special thank you to sponsors, American Legion Post 109, Lakeside Hospice, and VFW Post 4758.

CEPA 2016 Fall Season Tickets on sale July 18

Fall Season Tickets Flyer 2016 Reduced

Next week, tickets go on sale for the one of the most exciting seasons ever at the Pell City Center for Education and Performing Arts (CEPA).

In September and October 2016, CEPA is hosting four events that feature some acts that have never before taken the stage in St. Clair County, and Friday, July 15 is your first chance to clam your seats. Season Tickets include access to all VIP Receptions and start at $85 – a 30 percent discount – but act quickly because the number is limited!

Visit pellcitycepa.com to buy tickets beginning Monday, July 18

These passes not only grant access to all four events, they will also give you a chance to meet performers during special pre-show receptions and treat yourself and your family to one-of-a-kind experiences – right in your local theater.

The CEPA Fall 2016 Season includes

Sept. 24: A Magical Evening. Enjoy a captivating performance by the Magic City Magic Club, highlighted by local magician Brian Reaves. VIP / Season Tickets include access to a special reception featuring a private performance from magician Matthew Wilson prior to the main event. Individual tickets go on sale Monday, July 25 at 10 a.m. Reserved Seating is $10 per ticket, and VIP Tickets are $20 each.

Sept. 27: A Night at the Symphony. CEPA welcomes the Alabama Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Christopher Confessore, to the stage for the first time for a one-night-only performance. VIP / Season Tickets include access to a pre-show reception in the CEPA lobby. Individual tickets go on sale Monday, August 1 at 10 a.m. Reserved Seating is $20 per ticket, and VIP Tickets are $40 each.

Oct. 6: Confederate Railroad featuring local artists Two Halos Shy. Legendary recording artists Confederate Railroad take the stage in Pell City in a another first for CEPA. VIP / Season Tickets include access to a pre-show reception with the performers. Individual tickets go on sale Monday, August 8 at 10 a.m. Reserved Seating is $20 per ticket, and VIP Tickets are $40 each.

Oct. 23: Voices of St. Clair featuring Dolores Hydock, Flying Jenny and Whitney Junction. Pell City welcomes renowned storyteller Dolores Hydock to the CEPA stage to present “Footprint on the Sky: Voices from Chandler Mountain” accompanied by musicians Flying Jenny and including a special performance from local bluegrass artists Whitney Junction. VIP/Season Tickets include access to a pre-show reception with the performers. Individual tickets go on sale Monday, August 15 at 10 a.m. Reserved Seating is $10 per ticket, and VIP Tickets are $20 each.


How to Buy

The only way to be sure you see all four events at CEPA in Fall 2016 Season is to purchase a Season Ticket, CEPA Membership or CEPA Sponsorship. All three go on sale at 10 a.m. July 18 and include VIP passes to all four performances. The number of Season Tickets and Memberships are limited, and they aren’t expected to last.

Season Tickets – $85, includes one VIP Ticket to each performance

CEPA Fall Membership – $150, includes two VIP Tickets to each performance

CEPA Fall Sponsorship – $250, includes two VIP Tickets to each performance and company or individual representation on promotional material

Our new ticketing system makes it more convenient than ever to get passes to the shows you want to see at CEPA. Beginning Monday, July 18 at 10 a.m., simply visit pellcitycepa.com and click the “Buy Tickets” link on our homepage. From there, you can select the option that best fits your needs.

For the easiest, most effective way to secure your tickets, select the “Print From Home” option when you purchase. When you do, your tickets will be emailed to you, and you can bring them to the theater prior to the performance. Print From Home tickets can also be scanned right from your smartphone at entry.

You can also purchase tickets by phone by calling our Ticketing Call Center at (256) 358-7546. After speaking with an agent, you can decide whether to have us send your tickets via email or have physical copies delivered right to your mailbox (additional fees apply).

For more or to buy tickets, visit pellcitycepa.com.

Volunteers needed July 8-9 at CEPA

Volunteers needed july 8-9

The Pell City Center for Education and the Performing Arts (CEPA) is looking for volunteers willing to donate time on Friday, July 8 and possibly Saturday July 9 at our administrative office, located next to Pell City High School.

The City of Pell City and the Pell City School Board are graciously providing us with a much-needed new floor, and we need your help moving boxes and furniture into on-site, short-term storage.

Email Director Jeff Thompson at pellcitycepa@gmail.com, message us on Facebook or call the office at (205) 338-1974 and leave a message to let us know you’re coming.

Thanks so much for your support!

Tonight: Don’t miss ‘How to Eat Like A Child’ at CEPA

Marketing Drama Camp Performance 2016 2

How to Eat Like a Child – And Other Lessons in Not Being a Grown Up

2016 CEPA Sumer Drama Camp Finale

Friday, June 24 • 6 p.m.

Doors at 5:30 p.m. • Entry $5


Coming this Friday to the Pell City Center for Education and the Performing Arts (CEPA) stage is a play featuring some of the county’s finest kid actors doing what they do best – acting like kids.

“How to Eat Like a Child – And Other Lessons in Not Being a Grown Up” is a play that will see the members of this year’s CEPA Summer Drama Camp teaching lessons to each other – and the audience – about understanding the nuances of kid behavior.

So, for example if you ever wondered what it’s like to be a kid at bedtime (“I hate going to bed,” they say) or what kids do at school all day (“I put my head down and take a nap,” they add), these actors are ready to show you.

“It’s lessons like “How to Ride in a Car” that really crack us up,” said Ginger McCurry, Pell City High School’s drama teacher and instructor for CEPA’s Summer Camp. “When one child, pretending to be a parent, tells another to ‘draw an imaginary line’ and don’t cross it, adults get to see what they look like from their kids’ perspectives.”

The full-length musical comedy is abased on a book written by Delia Ephron, and in the the 1980s it was adapted into a TV movie starring Dick Van Dyke.

“How to Eat like a Child” will feature 18 local actors performing on the CEPA stage on Friday, June 24 at 6 p.m. The theater opens at 5:30 p.m., and the cost is $5 at the door.

For more, call CEPA at (205) 338-1974 or email pellcitycepa@gmail.com.

Lakeside Hospice hosting free event on Alzheimer’s, dementia on June 25

ALZ HEARTS REMEMBER

Presented by Lakeside Hospice

CEPA • Saturday, June 25 • Free

Informational Displays open at 3 p.m.

Remembrance Walk at 6 p.m.

Screenings of “I’ll Be Me,” the Glen Campbell story at 4 p.m. and 7 p.m.

The story of Glen Campbell's farewell tour following his Alzheimer's diagnosis, "I'll Be Me," will show twice at CEPA on Saturday, June 25.

The story of Glen Campbell’s farewell tour following his Alzheimer’s diagnosis, “I’ll Be Me,” will show twice at CEPA on Saturday, June 25.


Alzheimer’s Disease and dementia are foes that many in the U.S. have faced, be it by watching friends, neighbors and loved ones struggle to overcome or by taking it on themselves.

According to the Alzheimer’s Association, more than 5 million Americans are currently living with the disease, and it’s the sixth leading cause of death in the country. Those helping in the fight have contributed an estimated 18.1 billion hours of unpaid care.

But some see a glimmer of hope.

Recently, Lakeside Hospice’s Teresa Carden visited with dementia and Alzheimer’s patients at a nearby facility. Typically, she sings to patients, but this particular afternoon she simply took a stereo and played a selection of hymns.

She watched the faces of those in the room and chose to sit with a woman who hadn’t spoken a word or moved a muscle during any of her visits. Carden said she was holding the woman’s hand as the last song began to play.

“I was amazed at what I was seeing,” Carden said. “Moments ago, this woman was non-responsive. Suddenly, she got out of her chair and began to move around the room, pointing her toes and twirling to the music. She was doing ballet.”

“Were you a dancer,” Carden asked.

“Yes,” the woman replied, the first word Carden ever heard her say.

Coming Saturday, June 25 to the Pell City Center for Education and the Performing Arts (CEPA), Lakeside Hospice will present ALZ Hearts Remember, an Alzheimer’s educational event that will feature a documentary presentation, a renowned speaker on the subject and a remembrance walk at the facility. The goal of the event, Carden said, is to provide a place to network and learn for friends, family, caregivers and patients coping with the disease.

The point of the program is to understand how closely connected the human mind is to music and art, and to learn from others who have used it in battling fading memories.

I’ll Be Me RemembranceWalk

ALZ Hearts Remember will include a two showings of “I’ll Be Me,” a documentary made about country music star Glen Campbell following his diagnosis with Alzheimer’s disease.

Daniel-C-Potts-Headshot-180x180

Dr. Daniel C. Potts

In addition, neurologist Dr. Daniel C. Potts, a national spokesperson on dementia and Alzheimer’s, will present the story of his own father, who transformed from a saw miller to watercolorist as he fought the disease.

The event will also an information fair for patients and caregivers throughout, and a Remembrance Walk will take place in front of the CEPA building.

The first showing of “I’ll Be Me” will take place at 4 p.m., and a second screening will be held at 7 p.m. The Remembrance Walk will be held at 6 p.m.

For more information, contact CEPA at (205) 338-1974 or by emailing pellcitycepa@gmail.com. You can also find more information by contacting Carden or Bit Thomason at Lakeside Hospice at (205) 884-1111 or by visiting alabamalakesidehospice.com.


More on Glen Campbell and “I’ll Be Me”

In 2011, music legend Glen Campbell set out on an unprecedented tour across America. They thought it would last 5 weeks instead it went for 151 spectacular sold out shows over a triumphant year and a half across America.

What made this tour extraordinary was that Glen had recently been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. He was told to hang up his guitar and prepare for the inevitable. Instead, Glen and his wife went public with his diagnosis and announced that he and his family would set out on a “Goodbye Tour.”

The film documents this amazing journey as he and his family attempt to navigate the wildly unpredictable nature of Glen’s progressing disease using love, laughter and music as their medicine of choice.

Special appearances include Bruce Springsteen, The Edge, Paul McCartney, Blake Shelton, Sheryl Crow, Keith Urban, Brad Paisley, Taylor Swift, Steve Martin, Chad Smith and Bill Clinton among many others.


More on Dr. Daniel C. Potts

Daniel C. Potts, MD, FAAN is a noted neurologist, author, educator, and champion of those with Alzheimer’s disease and their caregivers. He was chosen by the American Academy of Neurology as the 2008 Donald M. Palatucci Advocate of the Year, serves as an AAN national media spokesperson for Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia, and is a faculty member at both medical schools in his home state of Alabama.

Inspired by his father’s transformation from saw miller to watercolor artist in the throes of Alzheimer’s disease, Dr. Potts formed Cognitive Dynamics, a foundation dedicated to quality of life improvement through the arts. Dr. Potts has co-authored A Pocket Guide for the Alzheimer’s Care Giver with his wife, and fellow Architect of Change Ellen W. Potts, MBA; Treasure for Alzheimer’s with Richard L. Morgan, PhD; and Finding Joy in Alzheimer’s: New Hope for Caregivers with Architect of Change, Marie Marley, PhD.

I’ll Be Me RemembranceWalk

Wonder what it’s like to be a kid? Hear hilarious lessons this week at CEPA

CEPA Summer Drama Camp - Eat Like a Child Promo

Students attending the 2016 CEPA Summer Drama Camp got into character this week in anticipation of their performance of “How to Eat Like a Child” on Friday, June 24 at CEPA.

PERFORMANCE at CEPA

How to Eat Like a Child – And Other Lessons in Not Being a Grown Up

2016 CEPA Sumer Drama Camp Finale

Friday, June 24 • 6 p.m.

Doors at 5:30 p.m. • Entry $5


Coming this Friday to the Pell City Center for Education and the Performing Arts (CEPA) stage is a play featuring some of the county’s finest kid actors doing what they do best – acting like kids.

“How to Eat Like a Child – And Other Lessons in Not Being a Grown Up” is a play that will see the members of this year’s CEPA Summer Drama Camp teaching lessons to each other – and the audience – about understanding the nuances of kid behavior.

So, for example if you ever wondered what it’s like to be a kid at bedtime (“I hate going to bed,” they say) or what kids do at school all day (“I put my head down and take a nap,” they add), these actors are ready to show you.

“It’s lessons like “How to Ride in a Car” that really crack us up,” said Ginger McCurry, Pell City High School’s drama teacher and instructor for CEPA’s Summer Camp. “When one child, pretending to be a parent, tells another to ‘draw an imaginary line’ and don’t cross it, adults get to see what they look like from their kids’ perspectives.”

The full-length musical comedy is abased on a book written by Delia Ephron, and in the the 1980s it was adapted into a TV movie starring Dick Van Dyke.

“How to Eat like a Child” will feature 18 local actors performing on the CEPA stage on Friday, June 24 at 6 p.m. The theater opens at 5:30 p.m., and the cost is $5 at the door.

For more, call CEPA at (205) 338-1974 or email pellcitycepa@gmail.com.

How CEPA Drama Camp changed the direction of one St. Clair student’s life

One year ago, Odenville student Maci Johnsey was heading into ninth grade at St. Clair County High School when she realized something – some day, she wanted to be on Broadway.

Click here to download the 2016 CEPA Drama Camp Registration Form

Pell City High School student Maci Johnsey changed schools last year to continue her drama education, a path she discovered through attending the CEPA Summer Drama Camp. Photos courtesy of Maci Johnsey.

Pell City High School student Maci Johnsey changed schools last year to continue her drama education, a path she discovered through attending the CEPA Summer Drama Camp. Photos courtesy of Maci Johnsey.

She had always been a singer, and she loved the stage. But after attending CEPA Summer Drama Camp two years in a row, she learned something else. She wasn’t just a singer.

“In the first two weeks, I learned in Drama Camp how to expand my ability,” Maci said. “I felt like through theater I could be so much better than I was with just a microphone.”

With that in mind heading into her ninth grade year, Maci made a choice. Many of her Drama Camp friends attended Pell City High School and participated in its drama program. If she wanted to keep going, she had to leave her Odenville friends behind.

“Although I didn’t know anyone at Pell City High School really, I was attached to the kids I spent the summer with,” Maci said. “I decided it was worth it, so I requested to change schools.”
So she did, and it seems to have paid off.

As only a freshman in 2015, Maci performed with the PCHS Drama Department at State Competition at Troy University. She was an assistant stage manager for The Addams Family, she ran special effects for Hiram: The Story of a Young Hank Williams, and she played three parts in the Department’s spring production, Shrek the Musical.

“Through all of this, I still managed to make it back to my old middle school and help with two productions,” Maci said. “Being 14 I could not drive, but my friends and family made it possible for me to eat and get home when I had theatre until 8 at night.”

Maci said that’s what she really received from Drama Camp in those first two years – unbreakable bonds.
“We are a great big family, and I have surely made many life long friends,” Maci said. “You can be yourself – be as different as you want to be – and everyone is is so warm and accepting.”

In 2016, Maci’s role with CEPA’s Drama Camp will change from student to teacher, as she now has the opportunity to impart some of her wisdom on to students who are in in the same position she was just a few years ago. In addition, she gets to work further with PCHS Drama Teacher Ginger McCurry, someone Maci said has an unparalleled level of compassion for both the program and the students who participate.

“Ginger McCurry is a great theatre teacher, and she makes it so easily possible for everyone that has a passion for theatre,” Maci said. “I could not be more proud to be her student. She is our teacher, our friend, our therapist, and our mom when we need her to be. She cares about us as much as she cares about her own children.”

This year, the camp will be open to students age 6-18 and will last two weeks, from June 13-24. McCurry, who has performed with a professional theatre company and taught music and theatre in the school, returns in 2016 to lead campers through improvisational games and a hands-on experience with technical aspects of producing a play.

Although mainly, CEPA Summer Drama Camp provides students with an opportunity to take the stage, as they will rehearse their lines in anticipation of the camp’s final performance on June 24 of “How to Eat Like a Child.” McCurry said the production is a collection of hilarious, family-friendly skits that campers will love to perform and that’s sure to entertain the audience.

Download registration information today at pellcitycenter.com. Cost to participate is $200 for an individual student or $385 for two students. The fee not only includes daily snacks and a camp T-shirt but also access to a wonderful summer experience.

The 2016 CEPA Summer Drama Camp
Ages 6-10: Daily, June 13-24, from 9 a.m.-noon
Ages 11-18: Daily, June 13-24, from 1 p.m.-4 p.m.
“How to Eat Like a Child:” Performed Friday night, June 24 at 6 p.m.

Click here to download the 2016 CEPA Drama Camp Registration Form

Contact Jeff Thompson, Executive Director
256-466-0715 • jthompson@pellcitycepa.com